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GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park.

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posted on May, 4 2021 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: putnam6

Any idea what the scale is? Just curious about the approximate size of the territories.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 03:32 AM
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a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

I have also heard "If you think you are wise think again". I have no idea who said that..lol




posted on May, 4 2021 @ 08:36 AM
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originally posted by: Skeletonized
Any idea what the scale is? Just curious about the approximate size of the territories.


No idea in the specific OP case. However, this is an interesting read for background...

Wolf behaviour


By nature wolves are very territorial animals. They can have a home range from 33 to 6,200 km2 but it depends on the type of wolf and where they reside. On average it is about 35 km2. This is quite a bit of territory for a single wolf pack to take over. That is why many of them overlap with others. It is seldom that these packs of wolves will come into contact with each other.

It is estimated that 50% of the territory of a wolf pack is covered daily.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:50 PM
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a reply to: putnam6

Wow ... it is really incredible how they respect some kind of invisible (to us?) kind of mutually-exclusive 'borders', only rarely straying from their own usual hunting grounds.

This GPS study image makes me wonder: so ... the borders between packs appear clear, and, does that infer that there are probably other wolf packs working in the outside bordering areas that were not included in this study, in every direction?

Also, why do they stick to such distinct general areas?

edit on 4-5-2021 by Fowlerstoad because: added some



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: Fowlerstoad

They piss on trees to mark their territories.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 05:03 PM
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originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6
Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.



Very cool stuff! Quite interesting how territorial they are - guess it is natures inbuilt way of ensuring each pack stays sustainable and they don't eat eachother out of existence.

When I was in the US 8 years ago and people were desperate to know how on earth we dealt with all the dangerous wild life here.

Our response was give me snakes and spiders ANY day over the likes of wolves, bears, mountain lions and whatever the hell else is prowling around out there. Most people said they'd prefer dealing with the US animals as they could see them.

Deaths from snake and spider bites here are extremely rare.


My family and I watched a program on NatGeo on box jellyfish. That prospect of experiencing vicious, uncontrollable pain from a sting in a matter of seconds, possibly not close to shore, was pretty unnerving.

I'm a fan of Survivorman, and in one of his ordeals in The Outback, he mentioned that Australia has the highest concentration of poisonous creatures of anyplace on the planet, although he did mention the caveat that it's actually a huge tract of land (being a continent and all) so one's odds of encountering such fauna are still pretty low.

I think I'd agree with the idea of preferring to deal with potentially dangerous wildlife I can see, versus say box jellyfish or a king brown snake lurking in the shrubs, but I definitely envy all of the cool creatures you have Down Under!



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: Fowlerstoad

They piss on trees to mark their territories.


^^^ This, you beat me to it.

Just about any creature that reproduces sexually will mark territory, either by urinating or depositing scent gland secretions on landmarks, to ward off competitors.



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