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GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park.

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posted on May, 4 2021 @ 12:37 AM
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Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.




posted on May, 4 2021 @ 12:51 AM
link   

originally posted by: putnam6
Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.



Very cool stuff! Quite interesting how territorial they are - guess it is natures inbuilt way of ensuring each pack stays sustainable and they don't eat eachother out of existence.

When I was in the US 8 years ago and people were desperate to know how on earth we dealt with all the dangerous wild life here.

Our response was give me snakes and spiders ANY day over the likes of wolves, bears, mountain lions and whatever the hell else is prowling around out there. Most people said they'd prefer dealing with the US animals as they could see them.

Deaths from snake and spider bites here are extremely rare.
edit on 452021 by IAMALLYETALLIAM because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:09 AM
link   

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6
Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.



Very cool stuff! Quite interesting how territorial they are - guess it is natures inbuilt way of ensuring each pack stays sustainable and they don't eat eachother out of existence.

When I was in the US 8 years ago and people were desperate to know how on earth we dealt with all the dangerous wild life here.

Our response was give me snakes and spiders ANY day over the likes of wolves, bears, mountain lions and whatever the hell else is prowling around out there. Most people said they'd prefer dealing with the US animals as they could see them.

Deaths from snake and spider bites here are extremely rare.


I guess it's what you get used to dealing with I suppose.

That said with the deadly snakes and the cassowary and crocodiles, salties as if the sharks weren't enough of an ocean challenge. There is a reason Australia was settled first with prisoners and America was settled by clergy. Hell I've slept in the woods here before, at least in the southeast, its not bad, Australia just seems you are gonna need hyper awareness



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:10 AM
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Perhaps that lone white one is running around looking for a mate.

This is how Wolves work when the pack size is too great. They send off young ones to find their own territory.

P



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:17 AM
link   

originally posted by: putnam6

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6
Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.



Very cool stuff! Quite interesting how territorial they are - guess it is natures inbuilt way of ensuring each pack stays sustainable and they don't eat eachother out of existence.

When I was in the US 8 years ago and people were desperate to know how on earth we dealt with all the dangerous wild life here.

Our response was give me snakes and spiders ANY day over the likes of wolves, bears, mountain lions and whatever the hell else is prowling around out there. Most people said they'd prefer dealing with the US animals as they could see them.

Deaths from snake and spider bites here are extremely rare.


I guess it's what you get used to dealing with I suppose.

That said with the deadly snakes and the cassowary and crocodiles, salties as if the sharks weren't enough of an ocean challenge. There is a reason Australia was settled first with prisoners and America was settled by clergy. Hell I've slept in the woods here before, at least in the southeast, its not bad, Australia just seems you are gonna need hyper awareness


I'm in the far south east whereas the saltwater crocodiles and cassowaries are all way up north, thousands of kilometers from me.

The most dangerous things we have here apart from snakes are the dingoes (native dogs/asiatic wolf) and the wild dogs which, judging by the shot ones I've seen hanging from trees in the high country can be as big as wolves. Oh, that and the yowies we are conversing about on my thread


We do however, have a disproportionate amount of the worlds most venomous snakes though.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:27 AM
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a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM




We do however, have a disproportionate amount of the worlds most venomous snakes though.


Because it is such a big land. I live in South Australia and frankly the dangerous snakes and spiders that live along the east coast have never bothered me and our few poisonous creatures are not likely to bother you much. Our snakes tend to run away when confronted. Just give them an escape route.

In the US though, they have all that we have plus big cats that jump out of trees, bears the size of mountain men, wolves, let's not forget about them.

For the region you live in, it is no more dangerous than any other place on earth.

Any land you live in is similar. Know your local nasties and how to deal with them. It is that simple.

P



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:34 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM




We do however, have a disproportionate amount of the worlds most venomous snakes though.


Because it is such a big land. I live in South Australia and frankly the dangerous snakes and spiders that live along the east coast have never bothered me and our few poisonous creatures are not likely to bother you much. Our snakes tend to run away when confronted. Just give them an escape route.

In the US though, they have all that we have plus big cats that jump out of trees, bears the size of mountain men, wolves, let's not forget about them.

For the region you live in, it is no more dangerous than any other place on earth.

Any land you live in is similar. Know your local nasties and how to deal with them. It is that simple.

P



100% correct - was at our local Field Days the other week (do you guys have the same thing? Big agricultural exhibition?) And there was a bloke giving a talk and presentation on snakes who said the exact same thing, that if you give them an escape route they will take it and will only strike when feel cornered. Something like 90% of people who get bitten are either trying to catch them or kill them.

He had; a Tassie Tiger Snake, Eastern Brown, Mulga Snake (incorrectly referred to as a King Brown) and an inland Taipan (most venomous land based snake int he world) which was really cool to see though slightly uncomfortable a few feet from my face.

They can keep all their big, sharp clawed and fanged animals - I know they say they carry guns with them but you can easily miss in that situation.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:43 AM
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a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

In all of my hunting days in this country going back into the seventies and eighties, never once did I need a weapon greater than a Ruger 10/22. I had bigger, my Sako .243 heavy barrel would take out anything out past the .22's range.

I had a .22 magnum Winny lever action that was great as well, but, if I was in the mountains of the US, I would want at least a 30/30 Winny as personal protection.

P



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:45 AM
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a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

Hard to believe there is not some sort of intelligent design plan working here on earth. These wolves in many ways are smarter than us humans. Maybe in all ways. I think a big problem for us humans is we have the tendency to believe we are above the nature you mentioned. It seems to me that nature, god, higher power, the grand poo bah or what ever you want to call it already figured out the game plan on how to live in harmony with all the other life on this planet. Are not all the living things on the earth intertwined and connected? Each has an effect on the other. Humans have the tendency to exploit everything/everyoe we come in contact with to the detriment of all the other inhabitants of the planet. We are just another branch of the animal kingdom. Not more important than any other living thing here. Although as I mentioned, I believe we are part of the nature of things here on Earth and may have been created to do just what we are doing. Who knows. Not me. Take what you need and leave the rest.

edit on 4-5-2021 by Diogeneser because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:49 AM
link   

originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

In all of my hunting days in this country going back into the seventies and eighties, never once did I need a weapon greater than a Ruger 10/22. I had bigger, my Sako .243 heavy barrel would take out anything out past the .22's range.

I had a .22 magnum Winny lever action that was great as well, but, if I was in the mountains of the US, I would want at least a 30/30 Winny as personal protection.

P


I would get an M16 with an RPG attachment if I lived there!

I'm just about to embark on my hunting career, recently got my license and Friday paid for a brand new Savage .22 bolt action with 10 shot mag. Going to learn the ropes on that and get a 30-06 in a few months time with the aim being deer hunting. We are so lucky in my area that we have Sambar, hog, fallow and red deer to go chasing.

I'm on a mission of self sufficiency in as many areas as I can and can't wait to make some venison kofta, sausages etc. etc. etc. and just another great excuse to be spending time out in the bush!



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:56 AM
link   

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: pheonix358
a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

In all of my hunting days in this country going back into the seventies and eighties, never once did I need a weapon greater than a Ruger 10/22. I had bigger, my Sako .243 heavy barrel would take out anything out past the .22's range.

I had a .22 magnum Winny lever action that was great as well, but, if I was in the mountains of the US, I would want at least a 30/30 Winny as personal protection.

P


I would get an M16 with an RPG attachment if I lived there!

I'm just about to embark on my hunting career, recently got my license and Friday paid for a brand new Savage .22 bolt action with 10 shot mag. Going to learn the ropes on that and get a 30-06 in a few months time with the aim being deer hunting. We are so lucky in my area that we have Sambar, hog, fallow and red deer to go chasing.

I'm on a mission of self sufficiency in as many areas as I can and can't wait to make some venison kofta, sausages etc. etc. etc. and just another great excuse to be spending time out in the bush!


Good choices all the way around.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 01:57 AM
link   

originally posted by: Diogeneser
a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

Hard to believe there is not some sort of intelligent design plan working here on earth. These wolves in many ways are smarter than us humans. Maybe in all ways. I think a big problem for us humans is we have the tendency to believe we are above the nature you mentioned. It seems to me that nature, god, higher power, the grand poo bah or what ever you want to call it already figured out the game plan on how to live in harmony with all the other life on this planet. Are not all the living things on the earth intertwined and connected? Each has an effect on the other. Humans have the tendency to exploit everything/everyoe we come in contact with to the detriment of all the other inhabitants of the planet. We are just another branch of the animal kingdom. Not more important than any other living thing here. Although as I mentioned, I believe we are part of the nature of things here on Earth and may have been created to do just what we are doing. Who knows. Not me. Take what you need and leave the rest.


Agree completely about the intelligent design of life and eco systems.

Whilst I don't think we are necessarily above nature perse I do think we have been endowed with our ability to respond beyond instinct (the place between stimuli and response) for a reason. Perhaps that reason is to be stewards of the other life on earth and do our part maintaining the natural balance.

Completely agree with taking only what you need hence why I believe gluttony to be one of the worst sins as it is the literal embodiment of taking more than you need and sapping precious energy for your own greed. Which we are all guilty of at times.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:05 AM
link   

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6
Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.



Very cool stuff! Quite interesting how territorial they are - guess it is natures inbuilt way of ensuring each pack stays sustainable and they don't eat eachother out of existence.

When I was in the US 8 years ago and people were desperate to know how on earth we dealt with all the dangerous wild life here.

Our response was give me snakes and spiders ANY day over the likes of wolves, bears, mountain lions and whatever the hell else is prowling around out there. Most people said they'd prefer dealing with the US animals as they could see them.

Deaths from snake and spider bites here are extremely rare.


I guess it's what you get used to dealing with I suppose.

That said with the deadly snakes and the cassowary and crocodiles, salties as if the sharks weren't enough of an ocean challenge. There is a reason Australia was settled first with prisoners and America was settled by clergy. Hell I've slept in the woods here before, at least in the southeast, its not bad, Australia just seems you are gonna need hyper awareness


I'm in the far south east whereas the saltwater crocodiles and cassowaries are all way up north, thousands of kilometers from me.

The most dangerous things we have here apart from snakes are the dingoes (native dogs/asiatic wolf) and the wild dogs which, judging by the shot ones I've seen hanging from trees in the high country can be as big as wolves. Oh, that and the yowies we are conversing about on my thread


We do however, have a disproportionate amount of the worlds most venomous snakes though.


Pretty much how it is here in the southeastern US. Only an occasional black bear and they will mostly run away. Rattlesnakes. Copperheads and Cottonmouths are plentiful not as deadly as the Australian versions but a biting encounter is likely gonna mess up your week. We got coyotes, bobcats but if we got bigger cats in the SE they are rare and elusive. We do have a wild boar and feral pig problem, but even they are charging at you can either shoot it or climb a tree. It's extremely rare to have a fatal bear encounter, except where Grizzlies might be found. While their range is expanding it's really just here and there out in the northwest. Mountain Lions are also mostly out west, there are big cat rumors in Kentucky and the Carolina's but those sightings are extremely rare.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:15 AM
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originally posted by: putnam6

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6

originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM

originally posted by: putnam6
Found this on Reddit, wasn't sure where to put it, Pets forum seemed inappropriate

GPS tracking of 6 different wolf packs in Voyageurs National Park in Minnesota. Notice how territorial they are and how much they avoid each other, although there's at least one wolf from the white pack who doesn't give a shift.



Very cool stuff! Quite interesting how territorial they are - guess it is natures inbuilt way of ensuring each pack stays sustainable and they don't eat eachother out of existence.

When I was in the US 8 years ago and people were desperate to know how on earth we dealt with all the dangerous wild life here.

Our response was give me snakes and spiders ANY day over the likes of wolves, bears, mountain lions and whatever the hell else is prowling around out there. Most people said they'd prefer dealing with the US animals as they could see them.

Deaths from snake and spider bites here are extremely rare.


I guess it's what you get used to dealing with I suppose.

That said with the deadly snakes and the cassowary and crocodiles, salties as if the sharks weren't enough of an ocean challenge. There is a reason Australia was settled first with prisoners and America was settled by clergy. Hell I've slept in the woods here before, at least in the southeast, its not bad, Australia just seems you are gonna need hyper awareness


I'm in the far south east whereas the saltwater crocodiles and cassowaries are all way up north, thousands of kilometers from me.

The most dangerous things we have here apart from snakes are the dingoes (native dogs/asiatic wolf) and the wild dogs which, judging by the shot ones I've seen hanging from trees in the high country can be as big as wolves. Oh, that and the yowies we are conversing about on my thread


We do however, have a disproportionate amount of the worlds most venomous snakes though.


Pretty much how it is here in the southeastern US. Only an occasional black bear and they will mostly run away. Rattlesnakes. Copperheads and Cottonmouths are plentiful not as deadly as the Australian versions but a biting encounter is likely gonna mess up your week. We got coyotes, bobcats but if we got bigger cats in the SE they are rare and elusive. We do have a wild boar and feral pig problem, but even they are charging at you can either shoot it or climb a tree. It's extremely rare to have a fatal bear encounter, except where Grizzlies might be found. While their range is expanding it's really just here and there out in the northwest. Mountain Lions are also mostly out west, there are big cat rumors in Kentucky and the Carolina's but those sightings are extremely rare.


Thanks for the info! Love learning about the environment and animals of other parts of the world.

There is also rumors and some evidence of big cats out in the Australian bush with many theories abounding such as they are escaped circus animals, were bought over as mascots of the US military in WW2 and some even suggesting they could be native, marsupial (carry their young in a pouch, only native Aussie animals do this!) big cats.

I have heard first hand stories from farmers and experienced bushmen who have seen these things along with anomalies like finding sheep carcasses up trees!

It's a big wide, wild world out there



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

Good point. There are not many theories, thoughts and opinions that I can say I believe to be undoubtedly true. I do think that just about anything anyone can imagine or think of is or can be possible. I like to listen to and ponder them all.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:24 AM
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a reply to: putnam6

I would only really worry about Grizzlies in the winter when food is scarce.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:48 AM
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a reply to: Wide-Eyes

Would you not be concerned about a mother with cubs nearby?



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:50 AM
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originally posted by: Diogeneser
a reply to: IAMALLYETALLIAM

Good point. There are not many theories, thoughts and opinions that I can say I believe to be undoubtedly true. I do think that just about anything anyone can imagine or think of is or can be possible. I like to listen to and ponder them all.



‘A man is I truly wise once he admits he knows nothing’ - can’t remember, may have been Plato



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 02:58 AM
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originally posted by: IAMALLYETALLIAM
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

Would you not be concerned about a mother with cubs nearby?


Fair point. That would be another good time to stay the hell away from them.

I think it's highly unlikely you would encounter them in the Spring though as it's mostly hunters who go deep into the forest and it's out of season.



posted on May, 4 2021 @ 03:01 AM
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Interesting thing about animals and their territories. Left to their own devices territories describe co-existence between packs.

I know an old man - a biologist - who studied badger territories in rural England. He was able to show how the interference of people broke those territories up and caused (for example) the spread of disease and conflict. This is because badgers usually stayed within territorial boundaries and there was not significant mixing.

I guess wolves must be the same. If one territory was disrupted (for whatever reason), imagine how the adjacent boundaries may be impacted?



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