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Easter Island discovery: Experts unravel mystery of ancient statues

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posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:09 PM
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Errrrrrr......Ok. I'll start by saying I don't endorse the below findings. Why would a group of people on such a small island go to the effort of doing this (considering we now now the actual size of these things) For those who don't know, they also have legs below the ground. However, it all seems a little too convenient.



IT’S a fascinating sight that has long baffled experts, but new research is finally shedding light on Easter Island’s most perplexing mystery.

Famously, there are approximately 900 statues, or moai, located around the remote Pacific island, known to locals as Rapa Nui. Most are found around the coast, and were built sometime between the years 1200 and 1600. So why, and how, did they end up there?

Researchers from New York’s Binghamton University are suggesting that the lost civilisation used the iconic statues to signal locations where fresh water was available.

Carl Lipo, an anthropologist who has been looking into how the local Rapa Nui people were able to survive with such limited access to drinking water, led a team who conducted field studies of groundwater around the coast. He wondered how, with no springs or streams and very little rainfall, did the civilisation of approximately 15,000-20,000 people survive? According to the research, published in the Hydrogeology Journal, they were forced to rely on brackish groundwater — which is saltier than fresh water but not as salty as sea water — found in coastal areas, for their source of drinking water. “Two field surveys indicate abundant locations of brackish but potable water along the coastline,” the study states.

“Although coastal groundwater sources are of poor quality, they were apparently sufficient to support the population and allow them to build the magnificent statues for which Easter Island is famous.”


Hmmm I'm not buying it to be honest. It's a bit like a free energy machine. The effort to produce these monster statues would surely be overtaken by the amound of water consumed??? HAHAHAH just a thought. But you get where I am coming from.


LINK
edit on 11-10-2018 by CaptainBeno because: LINK




posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:16 PM
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Yeah, seems like a lot of effort to mark water spots when a stick stuck in the ground would do.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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It's a small island now, but I believe it was part of an archipelago before the seas rose 300 feet after the last ice age melted. If that is true it puts those statues in a very different light.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: schuyler
It's a small island now, but I believe it was part of an archipelago before the seas rose 300 feet after the last ice age melted. If that is true it puts those statues in a very different light.


But they didn't build the statues until 1200-1600 AD.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

This doesn't explain why all but seven of the Moai face inland. Alternatively, it fails to explain why only those seven face towards the sea. If they were only for marking locations of groundwater, there would be no need to have them all facing towards the center of the island.

It's an interesting theory but I'm with you, I'm not buying it. Why carve massive statues to mark where to get water when they could've just placed an uncarved and much smaller rock there to denote where to get a drink?



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:51 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno




Researchers from New York’s Binghamton University are suggesting that the lost civilisation used the iconic statues to signal locations where fresh water was available.


To signal the locations?
That sounds ridiculous to put it mildly.

However, I would totally buy that they placed the statues to protect the location.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno

Not only do I doubt this theory but it will be readily accepted science for the next 200 years and every other discovery on the Island will be judged in light of this "truth."



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 07:05 PM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl

originally posted by: schuyler
It's a small island now, but I believe it was part of an archipelago before the seas rose 300 feet after the last ice age melted. If that is true it puts those statues in a very different light.


But they didn't build the statues until 1200-1600 AD.


How did they prove that?



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 07:16 PM
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We live in a civilization that literally sends up million pound rockets to loft dozens of whiz-bang satellites so we can locate our position within a meter or so when a simple map and compass would do.

The Egyptians (apparently) buried people in elaborate tombs involving lots of stone-carving and moving when a simple hole in the ground and a pile of fieldstones would have done.


So while I'm sort of skeptical of this explanation, I don't think it's completely outrageous that a sufficiently advanced civilization would choose grandiose markers for important locations.


+7 more 
posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 07:23 PM
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Every Island in the oceans are just mountain tops. Turn the clock back several thousand years, when the oceans were much much lower, back in time. Say during the last of the ice age. The base would be exposed. I'm willing to bet there are more things to discover off the coast of not just Easter Island now submerged by tide and time but all around the globe...



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: TobyFlenderson

Unfortunately, this is true



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno
Those statues always made me think of this poem.

In case you can't watch the video:

I met a traveller from an antique land, Who said—“Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. . . . Near them, on the sand, Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command, Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them, and the heart that fed; And on the pedestal, these words appear: My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings; Look on my Works, ye Mighty, and despair! Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal Wreck, boundless and bare The lone and level sands stretch far away.”


Linky
edit on 11-10-2018 by Skid Mark because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 10:31 PM
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I doubt if they were used as markers. The inhabitants there had brains, they would have known where the water was. A simple set of stacked stones could mark the spots.

It was a lot of work to make those statues, I do not buy this explanation. I know a few guys who have gone to Easter Island and spent time there looking around. One guy used some footage in a movie he produced. They were just talking about Easter Island at the conference last week. I just listen to the discussions, I haven't been involved in them. I never was good at talking in front of a crowd.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 10:48 PM
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That is one hilarious theory.
Doesn't anyone realize if one lives in an area for a while they KNOW where to find water ?
Did everyone need a reminder ?
Giant statue type reminder ?



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 11:26 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
That is one hilarious theory.
Doesn't anyone realize if one lives in an area for a while they KNOW where to find water ?
Did everyone need a reminder ?
Giant statue type reminder ?

Perhaps the statues had taps on them at one point that have since been removed by vandals. Or glaciers.

Harte



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 11:46 PM
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originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Gothmog
That is one hilarious theory.
Doesn't anyone realize if one lives in an area for a while they KNOW where to find water ?
Did everyone need a reminder ?
Giant statue type reminder ?

Perhaps the statues had taps on them at one point that have since been removed by vandals. Or glaciers.

Harte

So , would not marked wells been as efficient ?
And less trouble
Folks have been digging wells for thousands of years.



posted on Oct, 11 2018 @ 11:48 PM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl

originally posted by: schuyler
It's a small island now, but I believe it was part of an archipelago before the seas rose 300 feet after the last ice age melted. If that is true it puts those statues in a very different light.


But they didn't build the statues until 1200-1600 AD.


They were bored. Unlimited food, sex, sunshine and time on their hands. Needed a long-term project to work on.



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 12:00 AM
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If there were numerous "upper class" families in the population, the statues could each represent one of those families marking THEIR fresh water source. In order to protect THEIR water reserve, a large very heavy stone is a lot harder for another family to stake a claim on it, where a smaller stick or pile of stones would not protect it.

Basically, they may have used these large stones to prevent claim jumpers (like during the California Gold Rush).

That would make more sense to me if that were the case.



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 12:34 AM
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originally posted by: schuyler

originally posted by: KansasGirl

originally posted by: schuyler
It's a small island now, but I believe it was part of an archipelago before the seas rose 300 feet after the last ice age melted. If that is true it puts those statues in a very different light.


But they didn't build the statues until 1200-1600 AD.


How did they prove that?


I don't know that they HAVE proved that.

However it's thought that they started carving them shortly after they started arriving on the island, around 1200 AD.

Why, do you have some inside knowledge that today's archaeologists have missed?



posted on Oct, 12 2018 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: CaptainBeno


Like others have stated here in this thread: that seems an absolutely stupid explanation.

A European explorer to the island in 1722 described the islanders as bowing and praying to the statues, and sort of round platforms around them at the base.

Seems a more likely explanation than that they went to all that trouble to mark a location.



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