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Russian Soyuz Rocket Launch Failure, NASA/Roscosmos crew escape

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posted on Oct, 13 2018 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

As I noted earlier, aborted launches seldom go well. They were fantastically lucky to survive!

Too many things can go wrong, things are moving at extremely high velocities and forces are extreme. Even the slightest aerodynamic anomaly or orientation issue can exert incredible forces on things which aren't designed to endure, including the human occupants. I've been waiting to see if an interview would come out with the American on-board. I'm sure they got slammed around HARD! I saw one report which said their entire "ballistic descent" subjected them to 7g's the whole way (WOW!) until the chutes opened. Then there's the landing, which on the Soyuz craft is a pretty violent experience even on a normal mission.




posted on Oct, 13 2018 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk
They would have been in free-fall until the parachute opens, so I wonder why people are saying the experienced 7g all the way down. But the parachute opening must've been a jolt from hell.



posted on Oct, 13 2018 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Candidly, I didn't quite understand that either, but the fella who said this is a pretty credible space / rocket blogger.

Let me see if I can find the video again. I think he's Irish or Scottish or something. If I find it again I'll post it.



posted on Oct, 13 2018 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

I guess you guys are not playing KSP


According to the internet the capsule had a speed of 1842 m/s and altitude 57km at separation. At that height there is pretty much no atmosphere. So it would have continued going up ballistically, reaching maybe 100 km. Then it would fall at a steeper angle than usual and hit the denser atmosphere layers pretty hard. That is when you would feel the 7g or more.



posted on Oct, 16 2018 @ 01:47 AM
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Detailed report:
(emphasis mine)


According to Deputy Prime Minister Yuri Borisov, quoted by TASS, the emergency escape system was activated at T+123 seconds in flight. As a result, the escape began after the separation of the emergency rockets (at T+114.6 seconds) and the first stage at T+117.80 seconds at an altitude of around 50 kilometers.

A few hours after the accident, RIA Novosti quoted industry sources as saying that telemetry analysis had pointed toward a possible pyrotechnics separation problem between the first and second stage. According to industry sources quoted on the Novosti Kosmonavtiki web forum, the pressurization valve on one of the strap-on boosters of the first stage failed to open as scheduled to push it away from the second stage during separation and it led to the collision of the empty booster with the firing second stage and damaging or pushing it off course. According to Interfax, the impact of the first-stage booster caused the rupture of a (propellant tank) on the second stage and the loss of attitude control (of the entire vehicle). (Under normal circumstances, the nozzle of the oxidizer tank pointed 45 degrees relative to the main axis of the strap-on booster, generates reverse trust upon opening of the valve.)

Images available from the BSVK video system confirmed abnormal behavior of the D strap-on booster of the first stage with the failed oxidizer valve.

The accident took place during a phase of the flight, known as No. 1A, extending from the separation of the main escape rocket to the separation of the payload fairing protecting the spacecraft from aerodynamic loads. During that period, the propulsive role in ejecting the spacecraft from a failing rocket shifts to four solid motors, RDGs, attached to the payload fairing. One pair of these motors is activated on the emergency command and the other two engines fire 0.32 seconds later.

The failure command is issued on the basis of the data from angular velocity sensors on the second and third stages of the rocket. When those sensors detect a deviation of the vehicle exceeding seven degrees on the second stage or 10 degrees on the third stage, they generate an "avariya" (accident) command, which triggers the emergency escape sequence. However, after the separation of the four boosters of the first stage, the emergency escape scenario has a six-second pause to allow the firing core booster of the second stage to stabilize its flight after the somewhat violent separation process.

As a result, on Soyuz MS-10, following the "avariya" signal, which was displayed on the crew's console in the cockpit, four RDG motors were activated and pulled the payload section, OGB, including the Descent Module with the crew and the Habitation Module, away from the rocket, at T+122 seconds. Next, at T+160 seconds, the Descent Module was separated from the OGB stack and the capsule with the crew then entered free fall, heading for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Around that time, the crew (on the advice from mission control) activated the ballistic descent mode. The successful touchdown of the capsule took place around half an hour after liftoff, NASA officials said. However, mission control in Houston had some period of communications blackout, which obviously racked some nerves on the ground.


russianspaceweb.com...
edit on 16-10-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2018 @ 01:52 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: wildespace

Candidly, I didn't quite understand that either, but the fella who said this is a pretty credible space / rocket blogger.

Let me see if I can find the video again. I think he's Irish or Scottish or something. If I find it again I'll post it.




Scott Manley is the bloke you’re thinking of.



posted on Oct, 16 2018 @ 02:12 AM
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Uninterrupted footage of the separation: www.youtube.com...



You can see how the fuel tank gets ruptured by one of the boosters, and how the rocket starts swaying side to side.



posted on Oct, 16 2018 @ 07:36 AM
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a reply to: wildespace



the Descent Module was separated from the OGB stack and the capsule with the crew then entered free fall, heading for reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Around that time, the crew (on the advice from mission control) activated the ballistic descent mode.


Spacecraft are designed to generate lift on descent allowing for a long slower descent to reduce G loads on the spacecraft and crew

A ballistic trajectory slams back into the lower atmosphere at a steep angle generating much higher G loads during
descent

The Soviet Zond Circumlunar probes of the late 1960's, believed by many to have been an attempt to beat the US in the
moon race, used what is called a skip reentry - sometimes called a "double dip" .

Here the returning spacecraft would hit the atmosphere at an angle over the South Pole and bounce back into space
rising to an altitude of 400 miles before beginning its descent for landing

Objective was to reduce G loads and aerodynamic heating on reentry



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