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Why is Space black? What does nothingness look like?

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posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:25 AM
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I have never thought to ever come up with an explanation as to why is Space black until today. As I was at the beach today, my cellphone, t shirt, and sunglasses are all black. I thought they are going to get hot being out in the sun so reluctantly I put them in a white plastic bag I got from buying sunblock. Then I was reminded of how black absorbs light and white reflects it, which for some reason I started thinking of outer space.

Space is expanding and light is coming towards it. Maybe for the big bang to work, space has to be black for light to come towards it and to keep expanding. Can you imagine, how could the big bang work if space was a different color?

You can say there is nothing there so it's black by default, but before the big bang, how could there be darkness or black, if there is nothing? I don't think we are capable of imagining what nothingness looks like. After the big bang, you have darkness and black space, not before the big bang when there was nothing. The color of nothingness is incomprehensible.

So either someone or something created the Universe and the fact that space is black is proof of this.

Or light and black are somehow related and or even one in the same. Maybe black and light connect and are clearly observed in some higher dimension we cannot see.

Is it possible there is a real reason why Space is black?

What do you think?




posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:32 AM
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a reply to: game over man

Except space isn't nothing. It's actually full of stuff that we just can't see with our eyes.

Like the air is all around us but we can't exactly see it. Or even better example would be Radio and TV Energy and radiation all around us but we can't see that either. It's out of our spectrum.

Space is the same way. Full of Radiation and stuff we can't see unless we use something to see in that spectrum.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:36 AM
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Go into a windowless room, at night, and turn off block any possible source of light, and what 'color' do you see?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:46 AM
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I think a lot about topics such as these but more so I think about what existed before the Big Bang. What existed before and what is the expanding Universe expanding into exactly? What medium accommodates space? If space is comprised of particles, waves, and energy we either cannot see or measure then what does the space that space is expanding into consist of?

If the Big Bang is true or some version of it is true then the evolution of life is pretty damn amazing. From a singular explosion all of what we know today exists, is, and is evolving.

That's...absolutely...amazing.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:49 AM
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a reply to: game over man

Space doesn't have a color. Black is the absence of color. In the case of physical objects that are "black" — the surfaces are absorbing light across the visibile spectrum.

I did a thread back in 2014 about the blackest material humans had thus far created. It's reflecting so little light (it absorbs up to 99.965% across the visible spectrum) that you basically aren't seeing it. It's just like a hole punched in the visible world.

What's blacker than "black?" Vantablack!


edit on 2017-6-19 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:53 AM
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a reply to: Outlier13

I think about that too. I don't think there is a Space outside of Space that Space is expanding into, not exactly. What we call Space is actually full of energy and we don't actually know of any truly empty Space. There is always some form of energy in there.

So perhaps what we call space is just energy expanding into the background Dark energy. That dark energy is the negative Space/Energy that is the Space that our Positive Space/Energy is contained within. Something like that.

I don't think there is any actual "Nothingness" that can be absent of everything and anything. The most emptiness of space that physics can talk about still has particles popping in and out of that space.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 12:55 AM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

That's cools stuff. If you wore a suit of it you would look 2 dimensional. You'd be like a shadow without any depth to you.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:00 AM
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Turn on infred. If only we could see all the light spectrum... so much we are "missing" out on.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:21 AM
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a reply to: game over man

Space isn't black.. black is the word we use to decribe the absence of light.

Space is without light.



As far as things that are the color black. It is that they don't reflect much light. So your eyes register that as "no light" or black.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: mOjOm

There is the theory that the entire universe is shrinking at exactly the same rate like Hawking radiation from a black hole lol.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:28 AM
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a reply to: game over man

What is the color of nothing?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:29 AM
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a reply to: mOjOm

It's definitely what I'd be wearing if I was a super stealth ninja.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: mOjOm

Yes what he said, I mean you said , ok i think i've got it! I think i'll leave the thread now. lol.

This is an interesting topic though. To artists black is defined differently so it depends on who you ask.




edit on 19-6-2017 by Sapphire because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:43 AM
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The answer to the question is found in Olbers' Paradox. Basically, the fact the universe is moving around supports the fact that when you look up it's black.

Wikipedia


The darkness of the night sky is one of the pieces of evidence for a dynamic universe, such as the Big Bang model. If the universe is static, homogeneous at a large scale, and populated by an infinite number of stars, any sight line from Earth must end at the (very bright) surface of a star, so the night sky should be completely bright. This contradicts the observed darkness of the night.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: mOjOm


It's a good thing our eyes can't see into those spectrums, or we would live in constant blizzard white-out conditions, wouldn't we?



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 02:21 AM
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originally posted by: game over man

Is it possible there is a real reason why Space is black?

What do you think?

1 always felt the color perceptions of the Universes changes with the various observers inhabiting and visiting it...
Therefore the Abyss of Creation may appear as darkness to some and something entirely different to others.
Sort of like looking at the oceans from above and in the deep.
Good question



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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originally posted by: Sapphire
a reply to: mOjOm

This is an interesting topic though. To artists black is defined differently so it depends on who you ask.



that's more to do with the way that different pigments interact and influence each other and not really anything to do with the nature of light though



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: continuousThunder

I know.



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 03:13 AM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: mOjOm

It's definitely what I'd be wearing if I was a super stealth ninja.


In fact, you would stand out in the worst way over every possible background, as nothing else is as black as you then



posted on Jun, 19 2017 @ 03:17 AM
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a reply to: game over man


Maybe for the big bang to work, space has to be black

Actually, it's the other way round. Space is black to our eyes because the universe is expanding. Paraphi's post explains it correctly.




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